A ‘Last Hope’ Experiment Finds Evidence for Unknown Particles

A ‘Last Hope’ Experiment Finds Evidence for Unknown Particles

In the paper, a team of theorists known as BMW present a state-of-the-art supercomputer calculation of the most uncertain term that goes into the standard model prediction of the muon’s magnetic moment.

Physicists Learn to Superfreeze Antimatter (Hint: Pew Pew!)

Physicists Learn to Superfreeze Antimatter (Hint: Pew Pew!)

A big group of scientists centered at CERN, the Swiss particle physics lab, was already the best in the world at making antihydrogen, the antimatter version of hydrogen.

Nuclear ‘Power Balls’ May Make Meltdowns a Thing of the Past

Nuclear ‘Power Balls’ May Make Meltdowns a Thing of the Past

In a conventional nuclear reactor, the main line of defense against a meltdown is the fuel control rod, which power plant operators use to control the fission rate in the core.

A Super Sensitive Dark-Matter Search Yields Strange Results

A Super Sensitive Dark-Matter Search Yields Strange Results

More mundanely, the signal could come from contamination inside the experiment.“Despite being excited about this excess, we should be very patient,” said Luca Grandi, a physicist at the University of Chicago and one of the leaders of the 163-person experiment, which is called XENON1T.

‘Milestone’ Evidence for Anyons, a Third Kingdom of Particles

‘Milestone’ Evidence for Anyons, a Third Kingdom of Particles

Anyons, as they’re known, don’t behave like either fermions or bosons; instead, their behavior is somewhere in the middle.If the wave functions are identical, your quantum particles are bosons.

What Goes On in a Proton? Quark Math Still Needs Answers

What Goes On in a Proton? Quark Math Still Needs Answers

Faced with a task like calculating how three wispy quarks produce the hulking proton, QCD simply fails to produce a meaningful answer.“It’s tantalizing and frustrating,” said Mark Lancaster, a particle physicist based at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom.

Why Do Matter Particles Come in Threes?

Why Do Matter Particles Come in Threes?

In the 1970s, when physicists first worked out the standard model of particle physics—the still reigning set of equations describing the known elementary particles and their interactions—they sought some deep principle that would explain why three generations of each type of matter particle exist.

Cheap Nanoparticles Pave the Way for Carbon-Neutral Fuel

Cheap Nanoparticles Pave the Way for Carbon-Neutral Fuel

So in 2011, an Icelandic energy startup called Carbon Recycling International built the George Olah plant, which captures Svartsengi’s CO2 emissions and turns them into a carbon-neutral fuel.

No One Knows Why Rocks Are Exploding From Asteroid Bennu

No One Knows Why Rocks Are Exploding From Asteroid Bennu

“No one has ever seen an active asteroid up close like this,” says Carl Hergenrother, an astronomer at the University of Arizona and the scientist who proposed Bennu as the target for OSIRIS-REx.

What Makes an Element? The Frankenstein of Sodium Holds Clues

What Makes an Element? The Frankenstein of Sodium Holds Clues

Publishing this Monday in Physical Review Letters, the Riken physicists and their team confirmed that the limit for a fluorine nucleus is 22 neutrons, and a neon nucleus can contain up to 24.

Even Huge Molecules Follow the Quantum World's Bizarre Rules

Even Huge Molecules Follow the Quantum World's Bizarre Rules

Physicists have observed atoms, electrons, and other minutiae transitioning between wave-like and particle-like states for decades.It’s an extremely difficult experiment to pull off, he says, because quantum objects are delicate, transitioning suddenly from their wavelike state to their particle-like one via interactions with their environment.

Quantum Darwinism Could Explain What Makes Reality Real

Quantum Darwinism Could Explain What Makes Reality Real

One of the most remarkable ideas in this theoretical framework is that the definite properties of objects that we associate with classical physics—position and speed, say—are selected from a menu of quantum possibilities in a process loosely analogous to natural selection in evolution: The properties that survive are in some sense the “fittest.” As in natural selection, the survivors are those that make the most copies of themselves.

The Dutch Science Park Unlocking the Secrets of the Universe

The Dutch Science Park Unlocking the Secrets of the Universe

Related Stories To detect it, the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics developed a 17-inch glass ball, which physicist Paul de Jong calls an "insect eye." It contains 31 photomultiplier tubes that amplify the signals of electrons released by photons, helping scientists reconstruct the direction of the original particle that produced the light—illuminating not only neutrinos, but also black holes, supernova, and other mysteries of space.

The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature

The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature

The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature Cohl Furey, a mathematical physicist at the University of Cambridge, is finding links between the Standard Model of particle physics and the octonions, numbers whose multiplication rules are encoded in a triangular diagram called the Fano plane.