‘Forever Chemicals’ Are in Your Popcorn—and Your Blood

‘Forever Chemicals’ Are in Your Popcorn—and Your Blood

From that federal data set, known as NHANES, they discovered that people who reported eating microwave popcorn had significantly higher levels of four types of PFAS chemicals, according to a study published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Aziz Ansari's Netflix Special Will Make You Laugh—Awkwardly

Aziz Ansari's Netflix Special Will Make You Laugh—Awkwardly

It’s impossible to talk about Right Now without talking about the scandal, and, indeed, Ansari makes his brush with outrage culture the set’s backbone, providing scaffolding for all its most important moments, the good and the bad.

A Tesla ‘Truckla,’ Robotic Pizza Delivery, and More Car News This Week

A Tesla ‘Truckla,’ Robotic Pizza Delivery, and More Car News This Week

This week, we learned how a dedicated DIY-er DIY-ed a Tesla pickup truck (a “Truckla ”), why a robotics company is suddenly very interested in pizza , and how you might top a 22,000-mile trip around the world on a solar-powered plane.

The Future of Money, Facebook’s F8 Conference, and More News

The Future of Money, Facebook’s F8 Conference, and More News

The Future of Money, Facebook’s Big Conference, and More News. Tech leaders are singing a different tune than their lobbyists are, Facebook is set to make more promises at its annual developer's conference, and we're here to help you with your money.

In Automation, the Last Motion Will Come Before the Last Mile

In Automation, the Last Motion Will Come Before the Last Mile

If we want to see robots create economy-scale effects in the short term, we should skip the “last mile” and look to what I call the “last motion.” These are the short task sequences between previously automated streams of work in highly structured environments, where humans currently handle various uncertainties involving physical inputs, control actions, and outputs.

How Searching Nails Our Online Anxieties

How Searching Nails Our Online Anxieties

It’s a thriller in which the shocks are delivered not by slowly opening closet doors, but by a series of quickly clicked-open windows.Had Searching director Aneesh Chaganty been trying to create suspense in the same way 20 years ago, it likely would've felt as clunky as a teen's Livejournal—and probably wouldn't have made sense to half the audience.