Section 230 Is a Government License to Build Rage Machines

Section 230 Is a Government License to Build Rage Machines

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act protects “interactive computer services” like Facebook and Google from legal liability for the posts of their users.We could start by limiting Section 230 and making the platforms responsible, like any other publisher, for content they decide to promote and amplify.

Facebook Finally Cracks Down on QAnon

Facebook Finally Cracks Down on QAnon

Carnival disclosed this week that it was the latest victim, though the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing that the fallout should be limited.

Twitter Cracks Down on QAnon. Your Move, Facebook

Twitter Cracks Down on QAnon. Your Move, Facebook

Twitter’s announcement, she said, suggests that the company has gotten more serious about the real-world consequences of activity on its platform.

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like CultsMaddie McGarvey/Bloomberg/Getty ImagesIn recent months there’s been an increase in stories in which a follower of radical conspiracies shifts their actions from the web and into the world.In June, a QAnon conspiracy follower kicked off a one-man standoff at the Hoover Dam. Another QAnon supporter was arrested the next month occupying a Cemex cement factory, claiming that he had knowledge that Cemex was secretly assisting in child trafficking—a theory discussed in Facebook groups, in an attempt to push it into Twitter trending topics.Renee DiResta (@noUpside) is an Ideas contributor for WIRED, the director of research at New Knowledge, and a Mozilla fellow on media, misinformation, and trust.