Smaller Reactors May Still Have a Big Nuclear Waste Problem

Smaller Reactors May Still Have a Big Nuclear Waste Problem

A Department of Energy-sponsored report estimated in 2014 that the US nuclear industry would produce 94 percent less fuel waste if big, old reactors were replaced with new smaller ones.

The Nuclear Reactors of the Future Have a Russia Problem

The Nuclear Reactors of the Future Have a Russia Problem

Do this again and again in a series of centrifuges known as a cascade, siphoning off the U-235 each time, and pretty soon you’ll have low-enriched uranium, fuel for a traditional nuclear reactor.

Risks to Ukraine’s Nuclear Power Plants Are Small—but Not Zero

Risks to Ukraine’s Nuclear Power Plants Are Small—but Not Zero

“That’s certainly something I think the Russians would make an effort to avoid doing, not only because they don’t want to contaminate the country they’re trying to occupy—but, also, Ukraine needs electricity from those plants,” says Ed Lyman, senior global security scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists and coauthor of the book Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster.

Nuclear ‘Power Balls’ May Make Meltdowns a Thing of the Past

Nuclear ‘Power Balls’ May Make Meltdowns a Thing of the Past

In a conventional nuclear reactor, the main line of defense against a meltdown is the fuel control rod, which power plant operators use to control the fission rate in the core.

How to Refuel a Nuclear Power Plant During a Pandemic

How to Refuel a Nuclear Power Plant During a Pandemic

The latest shipment of fuel arrived at the plant well before the coronavirus pandemic brought the world to a standstill, says Greg Cameron, the nuclear communications director at Palo Verde.

Recycled Nuclear Waste Will Power a New Reactor

Recycled Nuclear Waste Will Power a New Reactor

For the past year, scientists at INL have started recycling spent uranium to meet the fuel needs of a new generation of small commercial reactors.

Scientists Fight Back Against Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemicals

Scientists Fight Back Against Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemicals

Electrodes above and below the surface generate plasma —a highly reactive gas made up of positive ions and free electrons—that interacts with the PFAS and breaks the carbon-fluorine bonds.“Our goal is to completely destroy the compound and not just transfer it from one phase to another,” says Michelle Crimi, an environmental engineer at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York, who works on emerging technology to remediate PFAS.

The Next Nuclear Plants Will Be Small, Svelte, and Safer

The Next Nuclear Plants Will Be Small, Svelte, and Safer

Operated by NuScale Power, an Oregon-based energy startup, this prototype reactor represents a new chapter in the conflict-ridden, politically bedeviled saga of nuclear power plants .NuScale’s reactor won’t need massive cooling towers or sprawling emergency zones.

Andrew Yang Wants a Thorium Reactor by 2027. Good Luck, Buddy

Andrew Yang Wants a Thorium Reactor by 2027. Good Luck, Buddy

Plenty of countries, most notably China , are investing heavily in molten-salt reactor research in general and thorium reactors in particular.

The 'Liquidators' Who Risked It All to Clean Up Chernobyl

The 'Liquidators' Who Risked It All to Clean Up Chernobyl

"Many live on a state pension."Skipp photographed the men and women with his Fujifilm GFX 50 in their homes, as well as at at a local museum dedicated to explaining the history of Chernobyl and Slavutych.

Next-Gen Nuclear Is Coming—If Society Wants It

Next-Gen Nuclear Is Coming—If Society Wants It

Next-Gen Nuclear Is Coming—If Society Wants ItArctic communities like this one are beginning to explore advanced nuclear reactors as a solution to their unique energy challenges.Third Way/GenslerThis story originally appeared on Grist and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration.Back in 2009, Simon Irish, an investment manager in New York, found the kind of opportunity that he thought could transform the world while — in the process — transforming dollars into riches.Irish saw that countries around the globe needed to build a boggling amount of clean-power projects to replace their fossil fuel infrastructure, while also providing enough energy for rising demand from China, India, and other rapidly growing countries.