California Bill Would Halt Facial Recognition on Bodycams

California Bill Would Halt Facial Recognition on Bodycams

The bill would ban the use of facial recognition algorithms in real time, when the body cameras are rolling, and in subsequent forensic analysis of footage.

Today's Cartoon: August 19, 2019

Today's Cartoon: August 19, 2019

Every weekday, WIRED publishes a new cartoon about the worlds of science and technology.And if that's still not enough, you can find all of WIRED's cartoons in one place, right here .Plus, sign up for the Daily newsletter and never miss the best of WIRED.

Facial Recognition Is Suddenly Everywhere. Should You Worry?

Facial Recognition Is Suddenly Everywhere. Should You Worry?

Three US cities, including San Francisco , recently blocked their agencies from using the technology altogether, while federal lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have expressed interest in regulating facial recognition.#facial recognition #Artificial Intelligence #algorithms #privacy.

Apple Contractors Will Stop Listening to Your Siri Recordings—For Now

Apple Contractors Will Stop Listening to Your Siri Recordings—For Now

Security News This Week: Apple Contractors Will Stop Listening to Your Siri Recordings—For Now. Justin Sullivan. After a report in The Guardian detailed Apple's use of contractors to "grade" the recordings of Siri users, the company has said it will suspend the program.

Pinterest Wants You to Relax, Equifax’s $700M Fine, and More News

Pinterest Wants You to Relax, Equifax’s $700M Fine, and More News

Pinterest Wants You to Relax, Equifax’s $700M Fine, and More News. Pinterest wants to calm you down, Equifax gets hit with a record fine, and facial recognition is still struggling with darker faces.

Think FaceApp Is Scary? Wait Till You Hear About Facebook

Think FaceApp Is Scary? Wait Till You Hear About Facebook

FaceApp is also the product of a Russian company that sends photos from your device to its servers, retains rights to use them in perpetuity, and performs artificial intelligence black magic on them.

The Window to Rein In Facial Recognition Is Closing

The Window to Rein In Facial Recognition Is Closing

Kade Crockford, director of ACLU of Massachusetts' Technology for Liberty Program, says findings like these surprise her even given the chaotic, unregulated intersection of law enforcement and facial recognition.

Airport Facial Recognition, How Abusers Exploit Basic Apps, and More News

Airport Facial Recognition, How Abusers Exploit Basic Apps, and More News

Airport Facial Recognition, How Abusers Exploit Basic Apps, and More News. Stalkers have ways of tracking you even without fancy malware, airport facial recognition is becoming more common, and WIRED has some advice on how to take the very best fireworks photos.

Cryptocurrency Company Hacks Itself Before Hackers Can Hack It

Cryptocurrency Company Hacks Itself Before Hackers Can Hack It

Security News This Week: Cryptocurrency Company Hacks Itself Before Hackers Can Hack It. Alyssa Walker. But Microsoft took the rare step this week of reversing course on some of its initiatives, deleting a database of 10 million images built from publicly available shots of 100,000 notable people.

Facial Recognition Has Already Reached Its Breaking Point

Facial Recognition Has Already Reached Its Breaking Point

Most directly called for a moratorium on government use of facial recognition systems until Congress can pass legislation that adequately restricts and regulates the technology and establishes transparency standards.

Social Issues Raised by Amazon Investors Aren't Going Away

Social Issues Raised by Amazon Investors Aren't Going Away

Amazon’s “apparent inaction on issues of climate change can present human capital risks, which have the potential to lead to the Company having problems attracting and retaining talented employees,” the investor advisory firm Glass Lewis wrote in its analysis of the resolution.

How Tech Companies Are Shaping the Rules Governing AI

How Tech Companies Are Shaping the Rules Governing AI

Tom Simonite covers artificial intelligence for WIRED.One of the 52 experts who worked on the guidelines argues that foundation is flawed—thanks to the tech industry. Benkler says the program is an example of how the tech industry is becoming too influential over how society governs and scrutinizes the effects of AI.

San Francisco Bans Agency Use of Facial Recognition Tech

San Francisco Bans Agency Use of Facial Recognition Tech

Gregory Barber covers cryptocurrency, blockchain, and artificial intelligence for WIRED.San Francisco’s ban covers government agencies, including the city police and county sheriff’s department, but doesn’t affect the technology that unlocks your iPhone or cameras installed by businesses or individuals.

An AI Pioneer Explains the Evolution of Neural Networks

An AI Pioneer Explains the Evolution of Neural Networks

Everybody says, “This is a smart idea, but we're not actually going to be able to design computers this way.” Explain why you persisted and why you were so confident that you had found something important. And on small data sets, other methods, like things called support vector machines worked a little bit better.

Robert Mueller Won't Testify Next Week After All

Robert Mueller Won't Testify Next Week After All

Look no further than reports this week that a hacker collective known as Fxmsp compromised three unnamed US antivirus companies, and is selling the purported source code and network access online for $300,000.

Google May Have Finally Made a Truly Usable Voice Assistant

Google May Have Finally Made a Truly Usable Voice Assistant

CEO Sundar Pichai called that a “milestone” because it means software that traditionally lives in Google’s cloud servers can be installed in Pixel smartphones Google will launch later this year, allowing the devices to respond to a person’s voice much more quickly.

Artificial Intelligence May Not 'Hallucinate' After All

Artificial Intelligence May Not 'Hallucinate' After All

Louise Matsakis covers cybersecurity, internet law, and online culture for WIRED.Now, a leading group of researchers from MIT have found a different answer, in a paper that was presented earlier this week: adversarial examples only look like hallucinations to people .

Kushner Used WhatsApp, a Very Bad Database Leak, and More Security News This Week

Kushner Used WhatsApp, a Very Bad Database Leak, and More Security News This Week

The lawyer told Congress, according to Cummings, that Kushner “took screenshots of the communications and sent them to his official White House account or the National Security Council,” in order to comply with those laws.

In the Face of Danger, We’re Turning to Surveillance

In the Face of Danger, We’re Turning to Surveillance

But they’re emblematic of something that’s happening more and more in the United States right now: people turning to surveillance, and specifically biometric surveillance like facial recognition technology, as a result of the US’s inability to take action to stop gun violence.

Beto O'Rourke Belonged to an Infamous '90s Hacker Group

Beto O'Rourke Belonged to an Infamous '90s Hacker Group

Security News This Week: Beto O'Rourke Was Part of an Infamous '90s Hacker Group PAUL RATJE/Getty Images This week ended with terror, as a shooting in New Zealand took the lives of at least 49 people at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Why Chinese Companies Plug a US Test for Facial Recognition

Why Chinese Companies Plug a US Test for Facial Recognition

“Both Chinese and international customers ask about it.” Yitu’s technology is in use by police, and at subway stations and ATMs. It’s currently ranked first on one of NIST’s two main tests, which challenges algorithms to detect when two photos show the same face.

Amazon Joins Microsoft's Call for Rules on Facial Recognition

Amazon Joins Microsoft's Call for Rules on Facial Recognition

In the post, Michael Punke, vice president of global public policy at Amazon’s cloud division, AWS, wrote that the company “supports the creation of a national legislative framework covering facial recognition through video and photographic monitoring on public or commercial premises.” Amazon has been pressured by civil rights groups after tests by academics and the ACLU found that Rekognition’s image analysis and face recognition functions are less accurate for black people.

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

The search company champions self-regulation, highlighting how it has chosen not to offer a general-purpose facial recognition service—as Microsoft and Amazon do—due to concerns it could be used to “carry out extreme surveillance.” The paper also says Google has limited some of the AI research code it has released, to reduce the risk of misuse.

San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

“This is the first piece of legislation that I’ve seen that really takes facial recognition technology as serious as it is warranted and treats it as uniquely dangerous.” Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University Privacy laws in Texas and Illinois require anyone recording biometric data, including face scans and fingerprints, to give people notice and obtain their consent.

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

But lots of people in Trump's orbit—and the president himself—have plenty of cause for alarm.It also looks increasingly like China was behind the years-long Marriott hack that impacted 500 million people, which in turn means that 2014 was a full-on assault on the US by state-sponsored Chinese hackers.

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

But Microsoft president Brad Smith took it one step further on Thursday, asking governments to regulate the use of facial-recognition technology to ensure it does not invade personal privacy or become a tool for discrimination or surveillance.Tech companies are often forced to choose between social responsibility and profits, but the consequences of facial recognition are too dire for business as usual, Smith said.

Facial Recognition Tech Is Ready for Its Post-Phone Future

Facial Recognition Tech Is Ready for Its Post-Phone Future

Eventually, several police departments decided to stop using it."The concerns I had a year ago were really that this separation of the different uses of the technology wouldn’t happen, that people would see facial recognition as this highly convenient offering and thus be more willing to accept it in other circumstances, like banking or ad tracking in a retail store, or by law enforcement," says Garvie.

Facial Recognition, a British Airways Hack, and More Security News This Week

Facial Recognition, a British Airways Hack, and More Security News This Week

Security News this Week: IBM Made Cops a Tool to Search Surveillance Video by Skin ColorCasey Chin/Getty ImagesTech went to Washington this week, and their biggest problems followed them.Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg faced Congress, and though Google CEO Larry Paige was invited, he declined to make the trip—a move that didn’t ingratiate him with Congressional watchdog Mark Warner.