Bright Spots in the Global Coral Reef Catastrophe

Bright Spots in the Global Coral Reef Catastrophe

In 2018, the International Panel on Climate Change reported that 1.5 degrees Celsius of global warming would cause global coral reefs to decline by 70 to 90 percent (warming currently stands at 1.2 Celsius).

Mapping the Way to Better Conservation in the Caribbean

Mapping the Way to Better Conservation in the Caribbean

© Steve Schill for As TNC’s lead scientist in the Caribbean, Dr. Steve Schill often works from a boat, collecting underwater data that are used to document the condition of coral reefs and other marine habitats.

How Hitchhiking Oysters Build New Reefs

How Hitchhiking Oysters Build New Reefs

Australian scientists have discovered that one oyster species — the Sydney rock oyster — forms new reefs with the help of another an unassuming mollusk: the mud whelk.

Tubeworm discovery in Hauraki Gulf cause for celebration

Tubeworm discovery in Hauraki Gulf cause for celebration

Scientists mapping the Hauraki Gulf seafloor have discovered huge colonies of tubeworms up to 1.5 metres high and collectively covering hundreds of metres providing vital habitats for plants and animals.

‘Environmental DNA’ Lets Scientists Probe Underwater Life

‘Environmental DNA’ Lets Scientists Probe Underwater Life

Stoeckle has been working with New Jersey state biologists to conduct DNA-based counts of commercial fish species by dropping one-liter bottles into the ocean at various depths and sampling the water inside.

Exquisite Underwater Photos to Make You Love the Ocean

Exquisite Underwater Photos to Make You Love the Ocean

At age 22, in 1994, he learned to dive, then became an instructor so he could do it all the time—eventually plunging in waters as far as the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean, and the South China Sea. Those countless hours spent underwater, just for the love of it, now inform his approach as a photographer.

Community MPAs Fail to Protect Important Reef Fish

Community MPAs Fail to Protect Important Reef Fish

Published in Coral Reefs , this research evaluates the effectiveness of locally-managed marine protected areas (MPAs) in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Community-based management fails to halt declines of bumphead parrotfish and humphead wrasse in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

“But we could use aquaculture to replace some of those water filtration benefits, and at the same time grow food.” In places where excess nutrients are a problem, like the Chesapeake Bay, shellfish aquaculture could even help offset the negative environmental impacts of other industries.

River Pollution Threatens Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

River Pollution Threatens Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

Northern Australia’s torrential wet-season rains carve 10-meter-deep gullies into the landscape, washing an estimated 17 million tonnes of sediment each year into the rivers and, eventually, out onto the Great Barrier Reef (GBR).

Recovery: New Hope for Caribbean Coral

Recovery: New Hope for Caribbean Coral

“Now we realize these are all caused by CO2 pollution,” says Dr. David Vaughan who directs coral-reef restoration for the Mote Tropical Research Laboratory at Summerland Key, Florida. Microfragmented Orbicella annularis, or boulder star corals, growing in nursery Photo © Dave Vaughan / Mote Tropical Research Laboratory

Nurseries Restore Staghorn Coral in the Florida Keys

Nurseries Restore Staghorn Coral in the Florida Keys

Despite spending a year helping to restore staghorn coral in the Florida Keys, this was the first time my snorkeling partner, Christina, from Coral Restoration Foundation had seen a huge staghorn colony in the wild.

Great Barrier Reef Foundation chief scientist: science will lie at the heart of our decisions

Great Barrier Reef Foundation chief scientist: science will lie at the heart of our decisions

In this way, the GBR Foundation has filled a critical gap in funding researchers who are working at the interface of science, climate change, and reef management.

‘Devastating’ bleaching of Great Barrier Reef hitting deep water corals harder than previously estimated, study shows

‘Devastating’ bleaching of Great Barrier Reef hitting deep water corals harder than previously estimated, study shows

The Great Barrier Reef harbours extensive areas of deep coral reefs which are much more difficult to study and were previously considered a refuge from higher water temperatures near the surface.

Geology Is Like Augmented Reality for the Planet

Geology Is Like Augmented Reality for the Planet

Geology Is Like Augmented Reality for the PlanetYou don't need a headset to see layers of meaning in Earth's landscapes and rock formations.Edmon de HaroIt’s an abnormally hot day in September and I’m standing in a cattail marsh in eastern Wisconsin, trying to change the way my students view the world.

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

And two of these factors — water depth and structural complexity — are easily and cheaply identifiable by somebody managing a reef. This paper gives reef managers an easily measurable tool that can be used to predict recovery and resilience.

Doubling Down on Coral Reefs

Doubling Down on Coral Reefs

If you work in reef conservation, it’s hard to miss the stories of coral bleaching. Why is Sewage Pollution a Significant Threat to Coral Reefs? The last thing we should be doing is giving up on coral reefs.

The End of Coral Reefs? Not Yet.

The End of Coral Reefs? Not Yet.

The other piece of climate change that is just beginning to affect coral reefs is ocean acidification. Warm water coral reefs and climate change.

What New Science & T.S. Eliot Teach Us About Ocean Acidification

What New Science & T.S. Eliot Teach Us About Ocean Acidification

A new study on the Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is one of the first to expose the effect that ocean acidification is already having on coral reefs. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

Reefs Like Zombies?

Reefs Like Zombies?

It was the kind of surreal conversation about coral reefs, parrotfish, climate change and, well, zombies that could probably only happen in a place like Key West.

Making Nature’s Value Visible (To All): Coral Reef Edition

Making Nature’s Value Visible (To All): Coral Reef Edition

The big takeaway: The countries with the most to gain — in terms of risk reduction — from reef conservation and restoration of their coral reefs are Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Mexico, and Cuba, where annual expected flood savings exceed $400M for each nation.