A Newfound Neuron Might Help Keep the Brain's Cells in Sync

A Newfound Neuron Might Help Keep the Brain's Cells in Sync

For Vikaas Sohal, a neuroscientist at UC San Francisco, who was not involved in the work, the discovery of these cells might help the field move away from conflicts about gamma rhythms. If they really are clock-like cells, he says, then signs of their timekeeping should show up in the rhythm of the local field potential.

No, Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams Aren't Married

No, Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams Aren't Married

No, Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams Aren't Married. The truth is they're not, but Turner understands why people think that. "People do think that we're a couple, sometimes," Turner says in the WIRED Autocomplete Interview above. But even so, Turner still thinks Williams is "that bitch."

'Heartbeat' Bills Get the Science of Fetal Heartbeats All Wrong

'Heartbeat' Bills Get the Science of Fetal Heartbeats All Wrong

These bills generally say that a “fetal heartbeat” helps predict whether a pregnancy will result in a living baby; the model legislation many states use refers to that fetal cardiac activity as a marker of “an unborn human individual,” defining a moment where alive-ness starts.

Apple’s Newest Watch Features Will Transform Heart Health

Apple’s Newest Watch Features Will Transform Heart Health

"At the same time, those of us who work in this field are looking at each other saying: Do you see the can of worms we might be opening here?"AppleWhat he means is that even if the Apple Watch's heart-monitoring features are accurate, it's not obvious that screening for AFib in millions of undiagnosed people will do more good than harm.

How Our Biological Clock Could Dictate Medical Treatments

How Our Biological Clock Could Dictate Medical Treatments

(The gold-standard test, the dim light melatonin onset assay, or DLMO for short, involves closely monitoring a patient's melatonin levels by sitting them in a dimly lit room and collecting their spit or blood every 30 minutes for a day or more.) And second, it's not always easy or practical to tell which therapies would benefit most from optimally timed administration.This week, researchers announced advances that confront both those issues: A simple blood test that researchers say could help infer a person's circadian rhythm, and a database of clock genes that encode targets for thousands of existing drugs.