Where Did Plants Come From? This Ancient Algae Offers Clues

Where Did Plants Come From? This Ancient Algae Offers Clues

But a few recent papers—two based on molecular biology, and one on rare, precious fossils from 1 billion years ago—are helping to fill in the gaps in our understanding of those ancient algae and what allowed them to eventually make the transition to land.

Climate change content for school kids gets revamp

Climate change content for school kids gets revamp

Young New Zealanders can now access the most up-to-date educational material about the science of climate change and its impacts on Aotearoa thanks to NIWA’s new web section: .

Scientists get first look at rocks causing slow moving quakes

Scientists get first look at rocks causing slow moving quakes

Two International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions to the Hikurangi subduction zone off the east coast of the North Island, undertaken in 2017 and 2018, mark the first time scientists from around the world had studied and directly sampled rocks from the source region of slow slip events using ocean floor scientific drilling methods.

The Magic of Teaching Science Labs Isn't Lost Online

The Magic of Teaching Science Labs Isn't Lost Online

To help flatten the curve of Covid-19 cases, universities across the nation have closed, and many professors are scrambling to transition to teaching online.Both of us have experience teaching lab courses in person, which often already involve an online interface for sharing syllabi, files, grades, and to foster student discussion.

Chloroquine May Fight Covid-19—and Silicon Valley’s Into It

Chloroquine May Fight Covid-19—and Silicon Valley’s Into It

A blockchain investor named James Todaro tweeted that an 85-year-old malaria drug called chloroquine was a potential treatment and preventative against the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

The Invisible Lives of Hand Dryers

The Invisible Lives of Hand Dryers

Contentious and often seemingly ineffective, hand dryers have become a virtually invisible part of everyday life.“They’re something you rely on and expect, but don’t ever recall,” says English photographer Samuel Ryde.“I realized that the hand dryer represented the bar,” Ryde says.

The Atlantic Ocean's 'Conveyor Belt' Stirs Up a Science Fight

The Atlantic Ocean's 'Conveyor Belt' Stirs Up a Science Fight

For decades, scientists have turned to the Labrador Sea to understand how ocean processes there may be affecting the strength of a massive oceanic conveyor belt known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

The Social Network Becomes a Social Science Subject

The Social Network Becomes a Social Science Subject

In the Foo Camp session, Stanford Law School’s Nate Persily, cohead of Social Science One, said that after 20 months of negotiations, Facebook was finally releasing the data to researchers.

NASA Puts a Price on a 2024 Moon Landing

NASA Puts a Price on a 2024 Moon Landing

NASA's human spaceflight chief, Doug Loverro, shared this number Monday at Johnson Space Center, as the Trump White House released its fiscal year 2021 budget.

Weathering With You Is an Environmental Power Fantasy

Weathering With You Is an Environmental Power Fantasy

The movie cuts to Hina falling through the sky like some celestial thing, witnessing supernatural weather patterns only she’s meant to see.The added water vapor caused by global warming, climate scientists have warned for decades, will coalesce as heavy rain not unlike the constant downpour in Weathering.

How to Be Humane to a Lab-Grown Brain

How to Be Humane to a Lab-Grown Brain

“In order for it to be a good model, you want it to be as human as possible,” said Hank Greely, a law professor at Stanford University who specializes in ethical and legal issues in the biosciences.

Athletic Authorities Must Reckon With Racing Tech Again

Athletic Authorities Must Reckon With Racing Tech Again

World Athletics (then called the IAAF) was acting on the certainty that “running blades,” engineered specifically for running fast, could perform better than regular legs.

No, the Wuhan Virus Is Not a 'Snake Flu'

No, the Wuhan Virus Is Not a 'Snake Flu'

The release of genetic data has also spurred a flurry of new research findings in recent days, including one paper published by a team of Chinese researchers last night in the Journal of Medical Virology that claims to have used the viral sequence to find the most likely source of the emerging outbreak.

Novels for Nature Lovers

Novels for Nature Lovers

But there are fictions writers out there who write well, and passionately, about the natural world.Many of them are written by novelists who are also scientists or science writers, and they all get the details of wildlife and wild places right.

Science Conferences Are Stuck in the Dark Ages

Science Conferences Are Stuck in the Dark Ages

Unlike teaching, where we have real consequences when we fail to modernize, such as poor evaluations and losing enrollment, there are no real consequences for the professional societies organizing the meetings or for presenting scientists.

Looking Back at 2019's Weirdest and WIRED-est Photo Projects

Looking Back at 2019's Weirdest and WIRED-est Photo Projects

When photographers show their work to us WIRED photo editors, common responses as to why they’re reluctant to show off some of their most interesting projects include “I wasn’t sure if this is WIRED's style,” or “I didn’t think you cover this.”.

12 Science Books You Should Read Right Now

12 Science Books You Should Read Right Now

Courtesy of Penguin Random HouseWhen novelist Dani Shapiro’s husband hits middle age and gets curious about his family history, he sends away for a DNA test .This is probably the only calculus book ever written that can truthfully be called a page-turner, which speaks to Strogatz’s strength as a writer and teacher.

The Expanse Is Sci-Fi Like TV Has Never Seen

The Expanse Is Sci-Fi Like TV Has Never Seen

I was thinking about medieval studies or French literature or history, but my entire life I had loved science and math.Allain: Beyond giving you a working knowledge of science, do you think your background has helped you in your career?

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

Another private forensics lab, in Texas, began building its own crowdsourced database exclusively for police searches this year.But when the child rapist Jeffrey Epstein died, and more of his nominally philanthropic donations became public, science faced a reckoning.

Mathematician Terence Tao Cracks a ‘Dangerous’ Problem

Mathematician Terence Tao Cracks a ‘Dangerous’ Problem

Earlier this year one of the top mathematicians in the world dared to confront the problem—and came away with one of the most significant results on the Collatz conjecture in decades.On September 8, Terence Tao posted a proof showing that—at the very least—the Collatz conjecture is “almost” true for “almost” all numbers.

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Photograph: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research InstitutePerhaps the most famous moon in the solar system (aside from our own) is Jupiter’s Europa.Photograph: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteIn 1989 after visiting the outer planets, Voyager 2 flew past Neptune and its large moon Triton.

Book Review: Secrets of Snakes

Book Review: Secrets of Snakes

Fortunately, wildlife biologist and science communicator David Steen has taken the most common snake myths, tall tales and snake safety rules and applied real science to them in his wildly entertaining Secrets of Snakes: The Science Beyond the Myths (Texas A&M University Press).A lot of our wildlife myths are about creatures that we believe we know.

We're All 'P-Hacking' Now

We're All 'P-Hacking' Now

The p refers to the p-value, a ridiculously complicated statistical entity that’s essentially a measure of how surprising the results of a study would be if the effect you’re looking for wasn’t there.

Are Saturn’s Rings Really as Young as the Dinosaurs?

Are Saturn’s Rings Really as Young as the Dinosaurs?

Previously, planetary scientists had assumed that Saturn’s rings were as old as the solar system itself—about 4.5 billion years old.“Every new exciting result gets challenged,” said Burkhard Militzer, a planetary scientist at the University of California, Berkeley and a co-author of the Science paper.

The EPA's Anti-Science ‘Transparency’ Rule Has a Long History

The EPA's Anti-Science ‘Transparency’ Rule Has a Long History

Although Orme-Zavaleta has spent 38 years at the agency and is its top scientist, she isn’t reviewing the new rule and couldn’t answer many questions from the congressional panel.

How Crime Scene Analysts Collect and Preserve Fingerprints

How Crime Scene Analysts Collect and Preserve Fingerprints

He demonstrated how to lift fingerprints off different surfaces, so they can be viewed under a microscope.“The first thing we want to consider is the surface itself,” Steiner says.Steiner uses a special white powder to gently dust fingerprints, making them visible to the human eye.

Physicists Get Close to Knowing the Mass of the Neutrino

Physicists Get Close to Knowing the Mass of the Neutrino

Its measured mass would also serve as a check on cosmologists’ theories for how the universe evolved.“Depending on what the mass of the neutrino turns out to be, it may lead to very exciting times in cosmology,” said Diana Parno, a physicist at Carnegie Mellon University and a member of the KATRIN team.

Trying to Plant a Trillion Trees Won't Solve Anything

Trying to Plant a Trillion Trees Won't Solve Anything

Last month a bunch of climate scientists and ecologists piled onto that tree research in the same journal, calling out numerous errors in the first team’s calculations.

Scientists share stunning images

Scientists share stunning images

Familiar with working in some of New Zealand’s most stunning environments, Crow is particularly attracted to Castle Hill because the limestone boulders add depth and interest to his photographs.Video of 2019 NIWA staff photographic competition - winning entries.

The Style Maven Astrophysicists of Silicon Valley

The Style Maven Astrophysicists of Silicon Valley

And while machine learning now constitutes its own field of study, because scientists from fields like astrophysicists have been working with those kinds of models for years, they’re natural hires on data science teams.“We were already in Big Data before Big Data became a thing,” says Sudeep Das, an astrophysicist who now works at Netflix.