Anchors cause “extensive, persistent” damage to seafloor

Anchors cause “extensive, persistent” damage to seafloor

“It seems that this problem is ‘out of sight, out of mind’ because the environmental footprint of anchoring is not yet considered in official reporting of global human impacts on the marine ecosystem,” Dr Watson said.

Survey provides snapshot of harbour’s health

Survey provides snapshot of harbour’s health

Greater Wellington Regional Council regularly assess sediment quality and seafloor community health in the subtidal areas of Te Awarua-o-Porirua (Porirua Harbour) and Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbour).

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

NIWA scientists and Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have used satellite technology to chart the Cook Islands’ seafloor in never-before-seen detail.The work was done as part of Seabed 2030 - a collaborative project to produce a definitive map of the world ocean floor by 2030.

Surveying scallop populations with artificial intelligence

Surveying scallop populations with artificial intelligence

To ensure the fishing surveys have the least impact possible, NIWA has been working with the University of Canterbury and Fisheries New Zealand to develop a non-invasive method of counting scallop populations.

Juvenile fish nurseries in the Hauraki Gulf

Juvenile fish nurseries in the Hauraki Gulf

The first type of nurseries are shallow areas of biogenic (living) habitats that ‘stick up’ from the seafloor and provide three-dimensional structures, such as horse mussel beds, subtidal seagrass, sponge gardens and calcareous tubeworm mounds.

This Intrepid Robot Is the WALL-E of the Deep Sea

This Intrepid Robot Is the WALL-E of the Deep Sea

“The rover helps us understand how much of that carbon might actually make its way into the sediments in the deep sea,” says MBARI marine biologist Crissy Huffard, who coauthored the new paper.

Study discovers microplastics in New Zealand’s seabed

Study discovers microplastics in New Zealand’s seabed

A pilot study carried out by NIWA and the University of Auckland has found microplastics in samples collected from the seafloor in the Marlborough Sounds.

Will Future Electric Vehicles Be Powered by Deep-Sea Metals?

Will Future Electric Vehicles Be Powered by Deep-Sea Metals?

“Our goal is to find out how much sediment the harvester will take off along with the nodules,” says Matthias Haeckel, a marine biochemist at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, who is coordinating the environmental review of GSR’s activities for a project called MiningImpact.

Is This a Fossilized Lair of the Dreaded Bobbit Worm?

Is This a Fossilized Lair of the Dreaded Bobbit Worm?

The researchers argue that this is a sign of struggle, preserved for millions of years in the fossil record: As a worm dragged a wriggling fish down into its lair, sediment would spill in to fill the void.

Wait, How Much Microplastic Is Swirling in the Atlantic?

Wait, How Much Microplastic Is Swirling in the Atlantic?

Macroplastics like bags and bottles are breaking into microplastics (defined as bits less than 5 millimeters long) that swirl in the water column and sink down to the seafloor .Writing today in the journal Nature Communications, scientists from the National Oceanography Centre in the United Kingdom say they can account for that missing plastic, and in the process reveal the stunning scale of the microplastic pollution problem.

Researchers on hunt for fish nurseries

Researchers on hunt for fish nurseries

However, NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Mark Morrison says no research was undertaken at the time of the closure of Separation Point to determine if the fish nurseries were present, nor has there been any since.

Mad Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Microbes

Mad Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Microbes

Elsewhere in the world’s oceans, much of the seafloor sediment is organic matter.There’s no upwelling and much less life at the surface, so much less organic matter is sinking to the seafloor to form sediment.

What to Do About CO2? Try Stuffing It Into the Gulf of Mexico

What to Do About CO2? Try Stuffing It Into the Gulf of Mexico

“These offshore CO2 storage facilities are probably a reasonable idea because the benefits of storing 1 million tons per year of carbon are larger than the effects of the leakage that may occur,” says Klaus Wallmann, professor of marine biogeochemistry at the GEOMAR Center for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, and an author of the report.

Seafloor Maps Reveal Underwater Caves, Slopes—and Fault Lines

Seafloor Maps Reveal Underwater Caves, Slopes—and Fault Lines

Greene and colleagues explored the Salish Sea with multibeam sonar sensors attached to the bottom of the research ship and seismic sensors on a small torpedo-like instrument towed 100 feet off the seafloor.