How Lost Hikers Can Send an SOS to Space

How Lost Hikers Can Send an SOS to Space

These instruments, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking program (Sarsat), picked up the signal and immediately pinged alerts to Earth.

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Researchers from Sustainable Seas and Our Land & Water National Science Challenges are involved in a two-year project called Ki uta ki tai: Estuaries, thresholds and values, which includes interwoven critical steps funded by MfE.

Smaller Reactors May Still Have a Big Nuclear Waste Problem

Smaller Reactors May Still Have a Big Nuclear Waste Problem

A Department of Energy-sponsored report estimated in 2014 that the US nuclear industry would produce 94 percent less fuel waste if big, old reactors were replaced with new smaller ones.

‘Flash Droughts’ Are the Midwest’s Next Big Climate Threat

‘Flash Droughts’ Are the Midwest’s Next Big Climate Threat

Fast-moving droughts like this one are developing more and more quickly as climate change pushes temperatures to new extremes, recent research indicates—adding a new threat to the dangers of pests, flooding, and more long-term drought that farmers in the US already face.

How Scientists Fish: The Hand Line

How Scientists Fish: The Hand Line

“You’ll know,” says Kydd Pollock, fisheries science manager for The Nature Conservancy and research leader for the Fishing for Science program at Palmyra Atoll.He had substantial experience with a form of hand line: He tagged more than 2,500 sharks at Palmyra using the method.

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

NIWA’s Freshwater Species Programme Leader Dr Paul Franklin said World Fish Migration Day, on May 21, is a good time to remind New Zealanders of the challenges migratory fish face, and also the research that is underway to provide solutions.

This Is Where Dirty Old Cars Go to Die

This Is Where Dirty Old Cars Go to Die

Ferdinand Dudenhöffer, director of the Center for Automotive Research in Duisburg, Germany, believes that the fixation on third- or fourth-hand vehicle imports in the developing world can be a distraction from the main cause of vehicle pollution: 90 percent of cars worldwide are sold in Canada, China, Europe, and the United States.

Stories from Palmyra: The Recapture

Stories from Palmyra: The Recapture

On the next Fishing for Science trip in February of this year, a scientific angler caught a bluefin trevally that had been tagged on February 6, 2020, at liberty for 753 days.Giant trevally caught and tagged on a Fishing for Science trip in February 2022.

Fishing for Science on Palmyra Atoll

Fishing for Science on Palmyra Atoll

© Kydd Pollock / TNC My fishing partner, Kawika Auld, a master angler from Hawaii, is already by the side of the boat, gloves on and ready to go.After 10 days, we had tagged more than 240 trevally, more than any previous Fishing for Science trip.

Easy access to environmental research data

Easy access to environmental research data

New Zealand’s seven Crown Research Institutes (CRIs) have created the National Environmental Data Centre (NEDC) website to make the environmental information held by CRIs more accessible to all New Zealanders.

The Energy Crisis Is Pushing Solar Adoption—for Those Who Can Pay

The Energy Crisis Is Pushing Solar Adoption—for Those Who Can Pay

“On that very first weekend when the price cap change came in, our inquiries increased by 300 percent,” says Richard Moule, a director at the Sheffield-based solar installers All Seasons Energy.

The Race to Rebuild the World’s Coral Reefs

The Race to Rebuild the World’s Coral Reefs

It has taken Carne and her team more than a decade to plant 160,000 coral fragments on less than 9 acres of reef.Coral restoration has not summed up to even 1/100,000th of the area of shallow coral reefs worldwide.”.

Chernobyl Was a Wildlife Haven. Then Russian Troops Arrived

Chernobyl Was a Wildlife Haven. Then Russian Troops Arrived

Orizaola had come to the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone to collect tree frogs and find out whether living in the shadow of disaster had a lasting effect on the creatures’ genetics.

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

In a rare opportunity to improve understanding of the nature and impact of a major volcanic eruption, NIWA scientists are sailing to Tonga to survey the ocean around the Hunga-Tonga Hunga-Ha'apai (HT–HH) volcano and surrounding regions.

Passing FAD: Partnership Protects the Reef at Palmyra Atoll

Passing FAD: Partnership Protects the Reef at Palmyra Atoll

That is thanks to an innovative partnership called FAD Watch Program between conservation and industry, specifically the US tuna fishing fleet, that is remotely tracking FADs to protect Palmyra, and provide important oceanographic data as well.

The Amazon Rainforest May Be Nearing a Point of No Return

The Amazon Rainforest May Be Nearing a Point of No Return

For a forest, one way to track resiliency is through a satellite measurement called vegetation optical depth, or VOD, which penetrates through the canopy and detects how much woody biomass there is.

Mean heat: Marine heatwaves to get longer and hotter by 2100

Mean heat: Marine heatwaves to get longer and hotter by 2100

New research from the Deep South Challenge: Changing with our Climate and NIWA shows that New Zealand could experience very long and “very severe” marine heatwaves by the end of the century.

Ukraine Is in an Environmental Crisis Too

Ukraine Is in an Environmental Crisis Too

The health effects of these kinds of wartime incidents are likely to be felt long after the physical conflict subsides, says Doug Weir, director of research and policy at the UK-based Conflict and Environment Observatory.

Offshore Wind Turbines Could Mess With Ships’ Radar Signals

Offshore Wind Turbines Could Mess With Ships’ Radar Signals

It turns out that massive wind turbines may interfere with marine radar systems, making it risky for both big ships passing through shipping channels near offshore wind farms and smaller vessels navigating around them.

Cutting-edge AI sea craft helping scientists count fish

Cutting-edge AI sea craft helping scientists count fish

“Hoki are one of the species we research – they have major spawning events, but we are currently only able to collect data on these for a few weeks every two years.NIWA hopes to be routinely using the vessel for monitoring fish within the next five years.

Public asked to help build national flood photo database

Public asked to help build national flood photo database

NIWA is asking people in flood-affected areas to contribute photos to a national database to support understanding of flood hazard and flood risk.I am really excited by the development of NIWA’s citizen science app, as we look to gather more information to support our country’s flood management decision-making.”.

Snapper on the rise

Snapper on the rise

Thirty years of management informed by a raft of scientific research appears to now be paying dividends.In the Hauraki Gulf, commercial and recreational fishers are reporting improving catches, and NIWA scientists will soon be able to estimate whether the highly valued Hauraki Gulf snapper population is seeing a similar increase.

Got an Invasive Army of Crayfish Clones? Try Eating Them

Got an Invasive Army of Crayfish Clones? Try Eating Them

Lyko led the ambitious genome study that established the extraordinary fact that all marbled crayfish originate from a single foundational female.

Scientists Are Racing to Understand the Fury of Tonga’s Volcano

Scientists Are Racing to Understand the Fury of Tonga’s Volcano

Ten-thousand miles away in England, Simon Proud, a satellite data researcher at the University of Oxford, began to monitor the twitching volcano using an array of satellites.Then, early in the morning on January 14 local Tongan time, a 12-mile-high plume of ash pierced the sky.

Global Ship Traffic Could Imperil the Antarctic’s Biosecurity

Global Ship Traffic Could Imperil the Antarctic’s Biosecurity

“We know from other cold areas in the world, including the Arctic, that things growing on the hulls of ships absolutely do get transported from place to place, and it is one of the major sources of marine introductions around the world,” McCarthy told Ars.

An Injection of Chaos Solves a Decades-Old Fluid Mystery

An Injection of Chaos Solves a Decades-Old Fluid Mystery

The scientists noticed that when the pusher fluid, which contains long-chain polymers, was pumped into the ground above a certain rate, it seemed to unexpectedly become much more viscous, or sticky, an effect later found in many similar systems.

Old Climate Clues Shed New Light on History

Old Climate Clues Shed New Light on History

Relying on new geochemical techniques for analyzing ice core sediment to determine the dates of ancient volcanic activity down to the year or even season, the paper, published in Nature in 2015, showed that major eruptions worldwide caused precipitous, up-to-a-decade-long⁠ drops in global temperatures.

Savanna Fire Management Can Fund Africa’s Protected Areas

Savanna Fire Management Can Fund Africa’s Protected Areas

Now, a new study demonstrates that fire management on Africa’s savannas can generate enough carbon revenue to fill the funding gap for many protected areas, as well as help restore the rangelands health and meet international climate commitments.

Wildfires Are Digging Carbon-Spewing Holes in the Arctic

Wildfires Are Digging Carbon-Spewing Holes in the Arctic

In the past 70 years, wildfires have burned 3 percent of the landscape but are responsible for 10 percent of thermokarst formation.

To Fight Climate Change, First You Need to Measure It

To Fight Climate Change, First You Need to Measure It

The aim is to determine the relative concentration of different methane molecules and gain a better understanding of where the pollutants are coming from, explains Emmal Safi, a higher research scientist at NPL.Boreas is one of dozens of unique pieces of equipment measuring pollutants at NPL.