Mad Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Microbes

Mad Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Microbes

Elsewhere in the world’s oceans, much of the seafloor sediment is organic matter.There’s no upwelling and much less life at the surface, so much less organic matter is sinking to the seafloor to form sediment.

'Microplastic Hot Spots' Are Tainting Deep-Sea Ecosystems

'Microplastic Hot Spots' Are Tainting Deep-Sea Ecosystems

“That does matter if fish and other animals are doing that, too, because we only eat their muscle tissue,” she says, because the plastic could be moving through the lining of their guts and concentrating in those edible bits.

Scientists Go Back in Time to Find More Troubling News About Earth's Oceans

Scientists Go Back in Time to Find More Troubling News About Earth's Oceans

Even if warming oceans don’t have a very big physiological impact on a species itself, climate change could still affect the organisms it interacts with.

Reducing sedimentation

Reducing sedimentation

While soil erosion and sedimentation are entirely natural processes, the rates increased markedly due to loss of forest landcover with the arrival of people in New Zealand, says Dr Swales.

Kaikōura earthquake provides world-first insight into submarine canyons

Kaikōura earthquake provides world-first insight into submarine canyons

“This study unequivocally demonstrates that earthquake-triggered canyon flushing is the primary process that carves out submarine canyons and delivers coastal sediment to the deep ocean,” says NIWA marine geologist Dr Joshu Mountjoy.

Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Dr Bostock first started work on the database 10 years ago when she was looking for information for a project that required her to look up archived paper files dating back to the 1970s and then digitise them.

Here's Why There Are Hundreds of Ancient, Mummified Penguins in Antarctica

Here's Why There Are Hundreds of Ancient, Mummified Penguins in Antarctica

Rather, these penguins, who were mummified by the cold, dry Antarctica environment, likely died from weather on the opposite end of the spectrum: two extremely rainy and snowy events that happened over the past 1,000 years, a new study finds.