Will Wildfire Smoke Worsen the Pandemic? We're About to Find Out

Will Wildfire Smoke Worsen the Pandemic? We're About to Find Out

Scientists still have much to learn about Covid-19, but, says Jessica McCarty, a geographer and fire scientist at Miami University, “We know that there's linkages between people who live in highly-polluted areas and their likelihood of getting any type of respiratory illness, as well as viral infections.” Smog from cars, for instance, remains a major threat to human health.

Scientists seek smoke sniffers

Scientists seek smoke sniffers

After almost six weeks of monitoring air quality during Level 3 and 4 lockdown restrictions, scientist Dr Ian Longley is now asking people to record where and when woodsmoke is affecting their health and lives.

Bushfire smoke continues trip around world

Bushfire smoke continues trip around world

The bushfires also caused a spike in carbon monoxide readings earlier in the year and last month NIWA scientists documented ash deposits on the South Island glaciers originating from the Australian fires.

Meet the Sulfur Miners Risking Their Lives Inside a Volcano

Meet the Sulfur Miners Risking Their Lives Inside a Volcano

Louie learned from his guide that workers spend 12-hour shifts dodging plumes of poisonous smoke (with many protected only by rags tied around their mouths) while carrying up to 180 pounds of sulfur on their backs.

To Train Foreign Service Agents, You Must Build a Fake Town

To Train Foreign Service Agents, You Must Build a Fake Town

The site, which opened in November after three years of construction, is meant to adapt to emerging security threats, and imparts the lessons of recent traumas like the attack on the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya.

Depth of Field: The Shared Memory of One World Trade Center

Depth of Field: The Shared Memory of One World Trade Center

The 104-floor building, the tallest in the US (1,776 feet not including its antenna), is, too, a story of despair and resilience and glamour.WIRED's New York offices are located in the building, which is home to Conde Nast's headquarters.

Psychedelic Portraits Made With a Hunk of Beveled Glass

Psychedelic Portraits Made With a Hunk of Beveled Glass

"I think every person ended up licking the glass or just smearing their entire face against it to get really interesting color fields with the makeup and sweat mixing," Whitmore says.

A Wildfire Was Extra Close to Home for This LA Photographer

A Wildfire Was Extra Close to Home for This LA Photographer

"I took a lot of the photographs from my driveway, essentially." The hard work of local firefighters saved the house, and Cooley continued photographing the aftermath of the fire, which eventually consumed over 7,000 acres, becoming one of the largest in Los Angeles history.

Burning wood - not as cosy as it seems

Burning wood - not as cosy as it seems

Smoke from home fires in winter can be smelt across our towns, causing irritation and annoyance to some, reducing visibility, and frequently causing air quality to exceed the National Environmental Standard. Although we don’t monitor smog directly, the levels of smoke are indicated by networks of air quality monitors operated by regional councils.

NASA's MISR views raging fires in California – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

NASA's MISR views raging fires in California – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite passed over California on July 27 and July 29, observing the Carr Fire on July 27 and the Ferguson Fire on July 29.

Just another day on aerosol Earth – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Just another day on aerosol Earth – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

On that day, huge plumes of smoke drifted over North America and Africa, three different tropical cyclones churned in the Pacific Ocean, and large clouds of dust blew over deserts in Africa and Asia.

Wildfire Smoke Is Smothering the US—Even Where You Don't Expect It

Wildfire Smoke Is Smothering the US—Even Where You Don't Expect It

By 2050, an estimated 83.7 million people over the age of 65 will call the US home, nearly doubling the current population—and a paper published in April found that bad smoke days during California’s 2015 wildfire season caused spikes in emergency room visits, with the most pronounced impact on patients over 65.

Your Tweets Can Help Map the Spread of Wildfire Smoke

Your Tweets Can Help Map the Spread of Wildfire Smoke

In a recently published study, US Forest Service researchers Sonya Sachdeva and Sarah McCaffrey found that, when analyzed in large numbers, tweets about wildfires can accurately model the way smoke moves.In their study, published by the International Conference on Social Media & Society, Sachdeva and McCaffrey analyzed close to 39,000 tweets posted between May and September 2015 in California.