Birth, Death, Weddings: An Oral History of Covid-19 Disruptions

Birth, Death, Weddings: An Oral History of Covid-19 Disruptions

Last Sunday afternoon, a friend of ours in New Jersey whose wife was also pregnant said he wasn’t going to be allowed in the delivery room because of the Coronavirus.On Thursday, March 5, I attended the meeting for my high school band’s annual spring trip.

Tell Us Your Pandemic Stories for Our Oral History

Tell Us Your Pandemic Stories for Our Oral History

Capturing the evolution of the Covid-19 pandemic, how this crisis unfolds and how our thinking about it changes, is critical both to understanding it now as well as to the stories we someday will tell about it.

Wait, Is That Backpack … Floating?

Wait, Is That Backpack … Floating?

I mean, it’s a cool invention—the idea of the HoverGlide pack is to reduce the awkward bouncing and jolting you get with ordinary backpacks.After all, once you leave the ground, there is a gravitational force on both you and the pack.

Remote Sensing Data Advances Soil Health Science

Remote Sensing Data Advances Soil Health Science

The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), developed by scientists and engineers at Dagan, uses publicly-available, remote sensing data from Landsat and Sentinel 2 satellites to monitor trends in the adoption rate of soil health practices—no-till, conservation tillage and cover crops—each year.

Wealthy Counties Benefited Most From a Flood Relief Program

Wealthy Counties Benefited Most From a Flood Relief Program

If some property owners who live near the ocean or in a river floodplain can be convinced to sell their homes, and the land is returned to open space, the entire community will benefit.

The Midwest's Farms Face an Intense, Crop-Killing Future

The Midwest's Farms Face an Intense, Crop-Killing Future

But, according to a report that DeLucia coauthored appearing in the journal Ecosphere today, if you’re a farmer trying to grow corn it means something very different: You need more water.

Climate Change Is Bringing Epic Flooding to the Midwest

Climate Change Is Bringing Epic Flooding to the Midwest

Super-soaked spring soils, unplanted fields, record-rising rivers, runaway barges—this is in all likelihood what climate change looks like for the middle of the country.

Why a Golf Ball Compresses Like a Spring—Until It Shatters

Why a Golf Ball Compresses Like a Spring—Until It Shatters

An experiment with a paperclip reveals both its elastic and plastic properties, a distinction that's key to how any material compresses or deforms. plastic properties of a paperclip with a graph that looks something like this.

Last Day of Spring Is a Powerful Exercise in Trans Visibility

Last Day of Spring Is a Powerful Exercise in Trans Visibility

Last Day of Spring is a visual novel that shows a trans person's struggle to find safety in a society built to exclude her from the very concept. Last Day of Spring feels like an honest look at Haru's struggle to find safety in a society built to exclude her from the very concept.

Meet the Workers Who Build an Entire City of Ice Every Year

Meet the Workers Who Build an Entire City of Ice Every Year

It takes almost 200,000 cubic meters of ice to construct the festival every year, all of it cut out of the frozen Songhua River in 700-kilogram blocks by a small army of local laborers.

The Promise of eDNA: A New Kind of Fieldwork to Guide Conservation

The Promise of eDNA: A New Kind of Fieldwork to Guide Conservation

Brave in the face of these field challenges, conservation biologists commonly embark on biological assessments to take the pulse of an ecosystem or monitor for the presence of rare or invasive species.

Adaptation as Acceptance: Toward a New Normal in the Northwoods

Adaptation as Acceptance: Toward a New Normal in the Northwoods

Adaptation as Acceptance: Toward a New Normal in the Northwoods In northern Minnesota, most tree planting takes place in the early spring. Here, quaking aspen are surrounded by white spruce and balsam fir. Smart nature straight to your inbox every week

Long-term Records Validate What We Know About Climate Change

Long-term Records Validate What We Know About Climate Change

Nature is validating what we know about climate change from long-term records of temperature. Earlier plant flowering in spring as a response to global warming in the Washington, D.C. area.