7 Emergency Preparedness Apps to Keep on Your Phone

7 Emergency Preparedness Apps to Keep on Your Phone

FEMA via Victoria Feng FEMA (the Federal Emergency Management Agency) is known to help Americans during natural disasters, but did you know they also have an app to help prepare before, during, and after an event?

The Tide Is High—and Getting Higher

The Tide Is High—and Getting Higher

A new study shows that nuisance flooding is exacerbated by dredging and the construction of piers and jetties that were intended to make coastal living easier but are in fact redirecting the flow of incoming ocean water and making high tides higher than ever before.

In 'The Mandalorian,' Stormtroopers Have Finally Discovered Tactics

In 'The Mandalorian,' Stormtroopers Have Finally Discovered Tactics

He then orders mortars to open fire to pin the enemy in place—one of the very rare sightings of an indirect fire weapon in the Star Wars universe.

What Is a Super Typhoon, and Why Are They So Dangerous?

What Is a Super Typhoon, and Why Are They So Dangerous?

The reason that both storms have been so strong and so late is that both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans have stayed warm this year, says John Knaff, a meteorologist at NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University.

Star Wars: Squadrons Explores the Changing Face of Fascism

Star Wars: Squadrons Explores the Changing Face of Fascism

Though the New Republic is just as diverse, if not more so, and the character options for both sides of the conflict feature more minority characters than not, it’s particularly striking to see the classically white, male Empire being run by women of color, commanding diverse squadrons and answering to no one but themselves.

What’s Causing the Mass Bird Die-Off in the Southwest?

What’s Causing the Mass Bird Die-Off in the Southwest?

Thousands of migrating birds have inexplicably died in the southwestern US, in what ornithologists have described as a national tragedy that is likely related to the climate crisis.

Why Hurricane Laura’s Storm Surge Could Be ‘Unsurvivable’

Why Hurricane Laura’s Storm Surge Could Be ‘Unsurvivable’

With the landfall comes a dreaded storm surge—a rise in water level generated by a storm—that scientists say could spread seawater up to 30 miles inland, an inundation the National Hurricane Center just called “unsurvivable.”.

Why Derechos Are So Devilishly Difficult to Predict

Why Derechos Are So Devilishly Difficult to Predict

At 8:30 am on Monday, Mark Licht was sitting in his home outside of Ames, Iowa, on a conference call with other agronomists and meteorologists from around the state.What farmers needed was a big storm, thought Licht, a cropping systems specialist at Iowa State University.

The Invasive Catfish That Walks Across Parking Lots

The Invasive Catfish That Walks Across Parking Lots

“Some might at first think that the walking catfish just wash out of the storm drain into the parking lot, but you never see peacock bass or other fish that live in drains,” Bressman says.

A Drop in Commercial Flights Is Bad for Hurricane Forecasts

A Drop in Commercial Flights Is Bad for Hurricane Forecasts

These algorithms, which capture the physics of cloud formation, tropical storms, and polar winds, among other things, are then populated with temperature data from satellites and surface observations to generate a three- or 10-day forecast.

How School Shutdowns Have Longterm Effects on Children

How School Shutdowns Have Longterm Effects on Children

But with schools closed for more than 1.3 billion schoolchildren worldwide, natural disasters can provide researchers with useful insight into a question they, and locked-down parents everywhere, are now asking: will the coronavirus shutdown have a long-term impact on children.

Space Photos of the Week: Cassini's Curtain Call

Space Photos of the Week: Cassini's Curtain Call

Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science InstituteLooking down from a great height of one million miles, this view of Saturn’s north pole reveals its hexagon-shaped storm and different windy bands.Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science InstituteIn this deep dive, Cassini provided a breathtaking view from below Saturn’s rings.

Scientists Chase Snowflakes During the Warmest Winter Ever

Scientists Chase Snowflakes During the Warmest Winter Ever

“One of the main things we are investigating is why some winter storms are very snowy and some are not,” she says.“You can tell by the shape of the snowflake at which temperature and how high in the atmosphere the snow is developing,” says Sova.

We don’t know much about lakes and climate change, says researcher

We don’t know much about lakes and climate change, says researcher

Lake scientist Piet Verburg was part of an international team of 39 researchers from 20 countries who carried out a recent review of current knowledge on how lake ecosystems respond to extreme storm events.

Hurricanes May Be Reshaping Big Parts of the Ocean

Hurricanes May Be Reshaping Big Parts of the Ocean

When hurricane winds temporarily plug up the Gulf Stream flow, that water sloshes back against the coastline, Ezer and other researchers have found, including flooding his neighborhood.“We started seeing flooding when Dorian was stuck near the Bahamas,” says Ezer, an earth scientist at Old Dominion University.

Why the Internet Thinks Tropical Storm Karen Is Hilarious

Why the Internet Thinks Tropical Storm Karen Is Hilarious

For the last three years or so, "Karen" has been the internet's stock female antagonist: a righteously annoyed middle-aged white woman who loves coupons, reverse mullet bobs, and, above all else, speaking to the manager.

The First Hurricane Relief Drone Was Ready to Fly—Then Dorian Hit

The First Hurricane Relief Drone Was Ready to Fly—Then Dorian Hit

As Hurricane Dorian whiplashed the Bahamas on September 1 with 185-mph winds, a drone with lifesaving potential was positioned at the Marsh Harbour airport on the island of Great Abaco.

Meet a Mad Scientist Who Flies Into Hurricanes

Meet a Mad Scientist Who Flies Into Hurricanes

If those forecasters don’t call it right , if they don’t nail down where the hurricane might make landfall and with what degree of intensity, people lose their lives.

Space Photos of the Week: Hurricane Dorian and Other Spirals

Space Photos of the Week: Hurricane Dorian and Other Spirals

We have the Voyager program to thank for some of this week’s spirals: When Voyager 1 first flew past Jupiter in 1979, it photographed the monster tempest swirling around and over on itself, and in 1989 Voyager 2 flew past Neptune and spied a small spiral storm that NASA nicknamed “Scooter.” Farther beyond are galaxies like our own spiral that contain gorgeous illuminated arms speckled with starlight.

Colonies of Aggressive, Social Spiders Boom After a Hurricane

Colonies of Aggressive, Social Spiders Boom After a Hurricane

They found that the most aggressive colonies were located in places with the highest historic exposure to cyclones.“There’s clearly some kind of selection going on here for the aggressive individuals in response to these extreme weather events, and that’s what’s really fascinating,” says George Uetz, a spider biologist at the University of Cincinnati.

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

Two reports released today by NIWA and the Deep South National Science Challenge reveal new information about how many New Zealanders, how many buildings and how much infrastructure could be affected by extreme river and coastal flooding from storms and sea-level rise.

The Bonkers Tech That Detects Lightning 6,000 Miles Away

The Bonkers Tech That Detects Lightning 6,000 Miles Away

And it would have gone entirely unnoticed by faraway humans if it weren’t for the assistance of a company called Vaisala, which operates the sensor network and uses it to triangulate a lightning strike, feeding the data to outfits like the National Weather Service.

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter’s Big Storm Is Blowing Over

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter’s Big Storm Is Blowing Over

This 300-year-old storm used to be huge—so big it could hold nearly four Earths, although over the past few decades it has been shrinking and no one knows why.#Space Photos of the Week #Jupiter #solar eclipse.

Tropical Storm Barry Pits New Orleans Against Water—Again

Tropical Storm Barry Pits New Orleans Against Water—Again

More than two centuries of trying to control the Mississippi with engineering and trying to protect New Orleans from floods and storms has made the city more vulnerable to severe weather—which is exactly what gets more likely with climate change .Levees along the Mississippi and its intersecting rivers, as well as channels for navigation and all kinds of other engineering, make the river as important to North America’s economy as it is to the continent’s hydrology.

You've Never Seen Waves Like This Before

You've Never Seen Waves Like This Before

Talibart, now a celebrated photographer, remains both frightened and fascinated by the sea, a tension she explores in her new series, Sirens , which was recently shortlisted for a Sony World Photography Award and will go on exhibition at the Sohn Fine Art Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts in September.

Space Photos of the Week: Keep Space Weird

Space Photos of the Week: Keep Space Weird

Fast-forward five years, and scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope noticed it was gone. Check out our latest buying guides and best deals all year round📩 Want more?

Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More

Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More

The Trail of Opportunity and More Eye Candy From Space The long and Martian road: In August 2010, the Opportunity rover looked back and took a photo of its tracks in the Red Planet’s sand.

California's Rain Was a 'Cat 4' Atmospheric River. Wait, What?

California's Rain Was a 'Cat 4' Atmospheric River. Wait, What?

Most of those multiday deluges are the product of atmospheric rivers, high-altitude streams of air that originate near the equator and are packed with water vapor.

The Elite Intel Team Still Fighting Meltdown and Spectre

The Elite Intel Team Still Fighting Meltdown and Spectre

"In the past no one was aware of these issues, so they weren’t willing to sacrifice any performance for security." Jon Masters, Red Hat At the center of these efforts for Intel is STORM, the company's strategic offensive research and mitigation group, a team of hackers from around the world tasked with heading off next-generation security threats.

You've Never Seen Thunderstorms Like These Before

You've Never Seen Thunderstorms Like These Before

For the past decade, photographer Mitch Dobrowner has spent a few weeks every summer pursuing extreme weather across the midwestern United States with veteran storm chaser Roger Hill, who, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, has witnessed more tornadoes (more than 650) than anyone in history.