Space Photos of the Week: Eyes in the Sky

Space Photos of the Week: Eyes in the Sky

The photo was taken with NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer—a telescope with a very wide lens that looks at the universe in infrared light.

Space Photos of the Week: Hubbub Over Hubble

Space Photos of the Week: Hubbub Over Hubble

We are entering low earth orbit this week and spending time with the Hubble Space Telescope.The veil nebula is a supernova remnant of a star that died a mere 8,000 years ago and was more than 20 times the mass of our Sun. When stars like this go supernova, they give off a massive shockwave pulse that pushes material out at astronomical speeds.

The Blazing Science of This Year's Total Solar Eclipse

The Blazing Science of This Year's Total Solar Eclipse

“So the detailed observations of the middle corona that we make at eclipses will remain unique for the foreseeable future.” He adds that the new telescope also can’t generate wide-field views the way smaller telescopes can during eclipses—allowing for study of the farthest reaches of the coronal footprint—nor can it match the resolution of the instrumentation on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory now in orbit around Earth.

New Space Telescopes Could Look Like Giant Beach Balls

New Space Telescopes Could Look Like Giant Beach Balls

He is also working on two NASA proposals to send the large balloon reflector to the stratosphere and the Terahertz Space Telescope to orbit.

Space Photos of the Week: Hot Hubble Time Machine

Space Photos of the Week: Hot Hubble Time Machine

But now, researchers have released a new image called the Hubble Legacy Field, and it’s more awesome than any other photo the telescope has ever taken. Light from these objects has been shooting across space since about 500 million years after the Big Bang and just recently hit Hubble’s camera.

China Finds Phone-Wielding Tourists and Telescopes Don't Mesh

China Finds Phone-Wielding Tourists and Telescopes Don't Mesh

In early April, says from the Pingtang County government website, officials held meetings with local residents and workers to “internalize the sense of responsibility and responsibility of protecting the [telescope].” The rules and outreach efforts come just after the announcement of a new television show about FAST, which state-run Zhongxin reported in late February.

The Perplexing Physics of Imaging a Black Hole

The Perplexing Physics of Imaging a Black Hole

This image shows the material around a super massive black hole in the center of a galaxy some 55 million light-years away. For the stuff around the black hole, it's not a visible light image.

Scientists Reveal the First Picture of a Black Hole

Scientists Reveal the First Picture of a Black Hole

The picture, taken over 5 days of observations in April 2017 using eight telescopes around the world by a collaboration known as the Event Horizon Telescope, depicts luminous gas swirling around a supermassive black hole at the center of M87, a galaxy 54 million light years away.

Space Photos of the Week: True Colors Shining Through

Space Photos of the Week: True Colors Shining Through

The Cat’s Paw Nebula glows in neon greens and reds, cranking out stars at an astronomical scale—it’s 80 to 90 light years across, so we’re not exaggerating. The result were images that looked back in time, filled with galaxies that, billions of years ago, had released light across the universe.

Space Photos of the Week: The Moon Needs Sunscreen

Space Photos of the Week: The Moon Needs Sunscreen

This region on Mars, called Mawrth Vallis, is of extreme interest to scientists who want to study the rich clays and minerals that exist on the Martian surface.

Space Photos of the Week: Magnetic Fields May Slow Star Births

Space Photos of the Week: Magnetic Fields May Slow Star Births

(Working in clear skies avoids the problem of images being blurred by clouds.) Recently, scientists have been using SOFIA’s new instrument called High-Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera-Plus, or HAWC, to study the Orion Nebula’s magnetic fields.

Space Photos of the Week: The Galaxy Next Door

Space Photos of the Week: The Galaxy Next Door

If you’re able to divert your eyes from the big show in the upper right, take a look at the object in the center of the image: That blue cloud is LHA 120-N 180B, likely an active star-forming region.

Now You Can Join the Search for Killer Asteroids

Now You Can Join the Search for Killer Asteroids

“When you visit the same piece of sky again and again, you can recognize, ‘Oh, this galaxy has a new star in it that was not there when we were there a year or three months ago,” says Rick White, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute , which hosts Pan-STARRS’s archive.

Space Photos of the Week: It’s Love vs. Hate in Star vs. Star

Space Photos of the Week: It’s Love vs. Hate in Star vs. Star

Clusters like these, dating back to just a few billion years after the Big Bang, are the source material for scientists looking to understand star formation, and by combining data from several telescopes they gain a better understanding on the goings-on at these nurseries.Two’s the charm: You’re looking at a white dwarf and a red giant, a binary star called R Aquarii.

Space Photos of the Week: A Star Is Born After Gases Crash

Space Photos of the Week: A Star Is Born After Gases Crash

And all this creation maybe have been the result of an accidental collision: Scientists believe a galaxy in the vicinity collided with ESO 338-4, and their subsequent interaction of gas and dust is what’s feeding all the stellar activity in this region.We’ve come across the galaxy cluster called Abell 2597 in our travels before, but never looking like this.

Astronomers Creep Up to the Edge of the Milky Way’s Black Hole

Astronomers Creep Up to the Edge of the Milky Way’s Black Hole

The idea, first proposed in 2005 by Avery Broderick, now at the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics and the University of Waterloo in Canada, and Avi Loeb of Harvard University, would explain why the black hole appears to flare.“It seems like they’ve got something really exciting here,” added astronomer Andrea Ghez, a longtime competitor to the European team at the University of California, Los Angeles.If these rotating flares are due to hot spots in the way that Broderick and Loeb imagined, additional flares will help reveal the black hole’s “spin,” a measure of its rotation.

Space Photos of the Week: Inside the Nebulae Where Stars Are Born

Space Photos of the Week: Inside the Nebulae Where Stars Are Born

For the youngest and brightest stellar objects, look no further than the Rho Ophiuchi cloud and the Carina Nebula.Closer to home, the Juno spacecraft is also producing jaw-dropping images, but of Jupiter.