Seen a stunning sunrise or sunset lately? The Tongan volcano may be the cause

Seen a stunning sunrise or sunset lately? The Tongan volcano may be the cause

To understand these sightings, the forecasting team contacted their colleagues at the Lauder Atmospheric Research Station in Central Otago, who confirmed that their ground-based LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) instrument has been detecting unusual spikes in aerosols in the stratosphere, at around 20-25 kilometres above New Zealand.

How Lost Hikers Can Send an SOS to Space

How Lost Hikers Can Send an SOS to Space

These instruments, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking program (Sarsat), picked up the signal and immediately pinged alerts to Earth.

Demand grows for NIWA’s Riparian Management Training

Demand grows for NIWA’s Riparian Management Training

The first Targeted Riparian Management Course since 2015 was held for Hawke’s Bay Regional Council staff in Napier over two days in late February 2022.There were 12 Hawke’s Bay Regional Council staff on the course with a background in physical geography, looking to increase their knowledge around stream ecosystems.

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Researchers from Sustainable Seas and Our Land & Water National Science Challenges are involved in a two-year project called Ki uta ki tai: Estuaries, thresholds and values, which includes interwoven critical steps funded by MfE.

Why Was the Tonga Eruption So Massive? Scientists Have New Clues

Why Was the Tonga Eruption So Massive? Scientists Have New Clues

A team of scientists from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, or NIWA, recently observed something different.The slopes of the underwater volcano are still largely as they were before the eruption; the same features still contour the surrounding seafloor.

Tonga eruption discoveries defy expectations

Tonga eruption discoveries defy expectations

NIWA’s research vessel, RV Tangaroa , has returned from a month-long expedition as part of the Nippon Foundation-funded Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project (TESMaP), where scientists were studying the effects of January’s eruption of Hunga Tonga–Hunga Ha'apai (HT – HH).

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

NIWA’s Freshwater Species Programme Leader Dr Paul Franklin said World Fish Migration Day, on May 21, is a good time to remind New Zealanders of the challenges migratory fish face, and also the research that is underway to provide solutions.

Burning Crops to Capture Carbon? Good Luck Finding Water

Burning Crops to Capture Carbon? Good Luck Finding Water

One controversial idea is known as bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, or BECCS: You’d grow crops and burn them for energy, then capture the emissions coming out of the facility and pump them underground as liquefied gas.

A Vast Underground Water System Helps Drive Antarctica’s Glaciers

A Vast Underground Water System Helps Drive Antarctica’s Glaciers

“If you don’t have water, you’re not going to get very far.” Making sense of that subglacial hydrology is especially important for researchers racing to model particularly precarious regions of ice, like the Thwaites Glacier, a few hundred miles away from Whillans.

Give Fitbits (of Sorts) to the Trees

Give Fitbits (of Sorts) to the Trees

Using off-the-shelf accelerometers, researchers have been quantifying how trees sway differently over time: when they’re warmer or colder, hydrated or dehydrated, weighed down by snow or unburdened.But with accelerometers, scientists have a new way of measuring how much rain or snow a particular tree in a forest ends up intercepting.

Fishing for Science on Palmyra Atoll

Fishing for Science on Palmyra Atoll

© Kydd Pollock / TNC My fishing partner, Kawika Auld, a master angler from Hawaii, is already by the side of the boat, gloves on and ready to go.After 10 days, we had tagged more than 240 trevally, more than any previous Fishing for Science trip.

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

Studies from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) have found that more than 100 billion kilowatt-hours are wasted every year because of vampire energy, “costing American consumers over $19 billion—about $165 per US household on average—and 50 large (500-megawatt) power plants’ worth of electricity.”.

Protecting and Restoring the Floodplain Forest

Protecting and Restoring the Floodplain Forest

© Chuck Peoples / TNC In 1989, the Conservancy purchased 10,626 acres along the river that became the Roanoke National Wildlife Refuge.Since 2002, the Conservancy has worked with the Corps of Engineers on dam releases that mimic natural flows, providing pulses of water to the floodplain forest that provide for vegetation and fish migration and spawning.

​​Oceans Aren’t Just Warming—Their Soundscapes Are Transforming

​​Oceans Aren’t Just Warming—Their Soundscapes Are Transforming

Changes in salinity, temperature, and pressure change how the sea sounds, with unknown impacts on the life-forms that depend on that noise to survive.

The Concrete Jungle Is Turning Green Again

The Concrete Jungle Is Turning Green Again

Their city eventually grew to more than twice Uruk’s population, and today Anuradhapura is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities and still cares for a tree planted over 2,000 years ago.

The Jumping Slugs of the Pacific Northwest

The Jumping Slugs of the Pacific Northwest

The new species of jumping slug was found in the same area and habitat as TNC’s Ball Creek Ranch Preserve, Idaho.

A Farmer’s Quest to Beat California’s Waves of Drought and Deluge

A Farmer’s Quest to Beat California’s Waves of Drought and Deluge

By late February, the dam operators were releasing more than 400 acre-feet per hour into the lower river—enough water to flood 400 acres of grapes or almonds shin-deep.

Drought Is Threatening Hydropower in the Southwestern US

Drought Is Threatening Hydropower in the Southwestern US

It’s a different kind of dynamic,” Melavic told Ars. But Fox noted that the reservoirs really only have winter and fall to fill up again with precipitation.

The Deadly Cyclone That Changed the Course of the Cold War

The Deadly Cyclone That Changed the Course of the Cold War

I. Landfall: Manpura Island, East Pakistan – November 12, 1970.Hai couldn’t see his face but knew that his uncle was smiling, as he always did when the family headed out into the Bay of Bengal to catch dinner.

Underwater Permafrost Is a Big, Gassy Wild Card for the Climate

Underwater Permafrost Is a Big, Gassy Wild Card for the Climate

“I think it's just absolutely remarkable that there are places on the seafloor where changes of this scale are happening at this rate,” says Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute marine geologist Charlie Paull, a coauthor on the paper.

Giant Redfin: Conserving South Africa’s Native Fish

Giant Redfin: Conserving South Africa’s Native Fish

Giant Redfin: Conserving South Africa’s Native Fish.Giant redfin and other freshwater species in the Cape Region face significant challenges.And the litany of challenges they face will be familiar to freshwater conservationists everywhere: invasive species, pollution, water quantity and habitat degradation.

Wildfire Resilience Treatments Work

Wildfire Resilience Treatments Work

That’s why the Conservancy and partners are working together on the Rio Grande Water Fund that generates funding for a 20-year program to restore 600,000 acres of forests in northern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado.

Ukraine Is in an Environmental Crisis Too

Ukraine Is in an Environmental Crisis Too

The health effects of these kinds of wartime incidents are likely to be felt long after the physical conflict subsides, says Doug Weir, director of research and policy at the UK-based Conflict and Environment Observatory.

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

NIWA scientists and Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have used satellite technology to chart the Cook Islands’ seafloor in never-before-seen detail.The work was done as part of Seabed 2030 - a collaborative project to produce a definitive map of the world ocean floor by 2030.

Sea Level Rise Will Be Catastrophic—and Unequal

Sea Level Rise Will Be Catastrophic—and Unequal

Last week, a group of federal agencies released a report detailing the dire state of sea level rise in the United States: On average, it projects up to 12 additional inches in the next 30 years, the same amount that the country has seen in the last century.

“Very rare find” of ghost shark hatchling

“Very rare find” of ghost shark hatchling

Neonate (newly hatched) deepwater ghost shark (Hydrolagus sp) [Photo: Brit Finucci].Most deep-water ghost sharks are known adult specimens; neonates are infrequently reported so we know very little about them.

A Strange, Endangered Ecosystem Hides in Underground Waterways

A Strange, Endangered Ecosystem Hides in Underground Waterways

Conserving salamanders and other underground life is a “huge deal,” said Tovar, “because they rely on the water that we rely on.” The health of underwater ecosystems can act as a barometer for the health of everything living aboveground, too, including people.

The Mysteries of the Ponderosa Pine

The Mysteries of the Ponderosa Pine

© Scott Carpenter/TNC Photo Contest 2021 Stick your nose into the bark of a tall, old ponderosa pine, and you’ll get a distinctive whiff of vanilla or butterscotch.Like an unruly family, the chemicals, plants, insects and birds do their thing, unwittingly helping the trees and the forest.

Should You Provide Birds Water in Winter?

Should You Provide Birds Water in Winter?

© Sjensen~ / Flickr Throughout the summer months, we supply birds with water, which they use for drinking, bathing, or simply cooling off.Going back to heated birdbaths, if managed properly, we can use these to allow birds to drink from it, and not bathe.

Big Gulp: Blue Catfish Eats Wood Duck

Big Gulp: Blue Catfish Eats Wood Duck

“The bay at the time was in a degraded condition, and fisheries managers thought blue catfish could provide something for people to fish for,” says Crum.