The Wetlands Are Drowning

The Wetlands Are Drowning

“We often call them ecosystem engineers,” says Pat Megonigal, an ecologist who directs the Smithsonian’s Global Change Research Wetland and studies the plants.For a long while, wetland researchers have wondered whether that skill could help the plants build their way out of climate change.

Restoring Emiquon’s “Wetland of Dreams”

Restoring Emiquon’s “Wetland of Dreams”

I’m in an airboat gliding across the glassy surface of The Nature Conservancy’s Emiquon Preserve , a restored floodplain wetland located along the Illinois River.

50 Fish, 50 States: The Bass of Emiquon

50 Fish, 50 States: The Bass of Emiquon

Miller / TNC As white bass fishing on Emiquon goes, this is a slow day.I know bass fishing is just a small part of Emiquon Preserve.

Overcoming a Climate Change Fallacy

Overcoming a Climate Change Fallacy

According to a recent study published in Nature Climate Change by Conservancy scientists and partners from Florida International University, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others, healthy wetlands (think wetlands covered with plants) are net sinks for greenhouse gases in the U.S. That means, on the whole, the country’s coastal wetlands remove more greenhouse gases – especially CO2 – than they release.