Want to Save the Whales? Eavesdrop on Their Calls

Want to Save the Whales? Eavesdrop on Their Calls

“And that's not really good when you're trying to hear animals that are many miles away making sounds.” So Baumgartner and his colleagues made the first 100 feet of mooring out of a rubbery “stretch hose.” When the buoy bobs on waves and tugs on the mooring, that stretchy bit coming off the instrument stays silent, allowing the hydrophone to listen for whales undisturbed.

Nature Nerd Trivia: Whales

Nature Nerd Trivia: Whales

It’s not that I don’t like trivia (I love it!)Most odontocetes feed on fish and squid, but some, including orcas, prey on marine mammals.© Jakob de Zwart/TNC Photo Contest 2019 What’s the largest species of whale, and how big are they?

Why Scientists Are Flying Drones Into Clouds of Whale Snot

Why Scientists Are Flying Drones Into Clouds of Whale Snot

Whale experts like Kerr want tissue samples to determine the health of the beasts, the problem being that it's somewhat difficult to do a biopsy on an enormous creature that only periodically comes to the surface to breathe.

The Ecologist on a Mission to Count New York's Whales

The Ecologist on a Mission to Count New York's Whales

The boat rides allow Kopelman to collect data for the Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island—an organization he co-founded in 1996—while also educating passengers about the incredible cetaceans and pinnipeds swimming (and singing) just miles from shore.“People are surprised to learn there are marine mammals in New York,” Kopelman says, “perhaps because it’s an area that also has some of the densest human populations in the world.”The New York Bight—a coastal region stretching from the northern tip of Long Island to southern New Jersey—is a frolicking ground for 19 species of whales, dolphins and porpoises, as well as four species of seal.