DejaBlue: New BlueKeep-Style Bugs Mean You Need to Update Windows Now

DejaBlue: New BlueKeep-Style Bugs Mean You Need to Update Windows Now

Marcus Hutchins, a security researcher who has closely followed the RDP vulnerabilities and coded a proof-of-concept tool for exploiting BlueKeep, says that there may well be more machines vulnerable to DejaBlue than to BlueKeep.

Eyeless worm a window into our diverse ocean

Eyeless worm a window into our diverse ocean

NIC manager Sadie Mills says staff on research vessels and fisheries observers use identification guides to help them to identify common species and over the past few years have become much more proficient at what they do.

Why Ground Squirrels Look Like They’re Kissing

Why Ground Squirrels Look Like They’re Kissing

Why Ground Squirrels Look Like They’re Kissing. Photo © Dan Streiffert /Flickr Mateo started studying ground squirrels in 2002. While the ground squirrels I’m watching in Idaho don’t show family favor, they still recognize relatives even after hibernating for nine months.

Microsoft's BlueKeep Bug Isn't Getting Patched Fast Enough

Microsoft's BlueKeep Bug Isn't Getting Patched Fast Enough

When security researcher Rob Graham scanned the entire public internet for BlueKeep-vulnerable machines on Monday, using a tool he built, he found that 923,671 machines hadn't been patched, and were thus still exposed to any potential worm.

The Real Reason You See Earthworms After Rain

The Real Reason You See Earthworms After Rain

It is probably one of the first “nature lessons” we learned at school: earthworms have to come to the surface after rain because they’re drowning. Another common explanation for worm emergence is that rain sounds like predators, so the worms come to the surface to escape.

Far Out! Worms May Dose Mice With Cannabinoids to Kill the Pain

Far Out! Worms May Dose Mice With Cannabinoids to Kill the Pain

Meaning, your late car payment ain’t got nothing on spending your entire life in an intestine.Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found that one nematode worm, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, appears to boost its odds of survival by dosing its rodent hosts with endocannabinoids, molecules that are known to reduce inflammation.